sarajevomoja:

Everything right with this video on Happy British Muslims [youtube]

There has been a lot of religious controversy surrounding this video. A lot of religious clerics that live in the West have declared this video an inadmissible representation of how Muslims should act or behave. People have even made a “halal” version of this same video, editing out women (and allow me to offer my two cents here and just roughly cough out: misogyny). 

Despite these absolutely repulsive interpretations of what it means to “behave” Muslim, I find this video absolutely amazing! 

And here’s why:

  • Muslim women are a big portion of what makes this video so successful. There are Muslim women of different races, ethnicities, and ages. They’re comfortable in sharing with us a small but vivid insight into their lives through their hobbies. Some women like to bike, some like to hang out with their friends, some like to produce music, and some are clearly fashionistas (werk werk werk!). 
  • Notice how NOT ALL WOMEN are with their spouses. Here, Muslim women are chilling with their friends, family, strangers, and community, and some are celebrating their happiness alone. And the women who are with their spouses are clearly celebrating life (which bombards every stereotypical concept of an Islamic marriage). 
  • This is just a small detail, but I want yall to notice how some people are singing the lyrics as they’re performing, and I think that’s really significant and amazing. Like yeah, some of us listen to music, and that’s okay. This fact signifies how diverse Muslims actually are; yeah, some of us actually like to listen and sing along to music. 
  • THIS VIDEO MAKES ME HAPPY
  • There are a few contemporary theologians in this video: Sheikh Murad (the guy who holds up the Im Happy sign), for example. Another professional is Sister Cerrah (who has a PhD and is one of the Muslim women in the beginning of the video who sings along to the lyrics), Sister Salma Yaqoob (who is a psychotherapist), Sister Kubra (a journalist who studies at Oxford). 
  • You’ll notice brothers in traditional Islamic clothing (like abayas for example) who also observe sunnah tradition (like having a long beard) dancing and singing. The reason why this is amazing because we usually have this perception of Muslim brothers who observe their hijab as serious and anti-social. But nope! Here, they’re tuning in, and they are working it!
  • Everyone is just super cute and super happy and super lovely.

Watch this video! You won’t regret it!

mariejacquelyn:

britishstarr:

kkristoff:

cold-never-bothered-me-anyways:

Arabian Little Red Riding Hood with a red hijab

A Japanese Snow White with her coveted pale skin and shiny black hair

Mexican Cinderella with colorful Mexican glass blown slippers

Greek Beauty and the Beast where Beast is a minotaur

Culture-bent fairy tales that keep key canonical characteristics

GIVE ME THESE I M M E D I A T E L Y

I AM SO TEMPTED TO DRAW THIS YOU HAVE NO IDEA

HERE THEY ARE, I TRIED! Used loads of reference pictures to make these and still probably got something wrong. 

Little Red Hijab with a basket of naan and milk and dates to take to Jiddah. 

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Shirayuki, with lips as red as blood and skin as white as snow, who was tempted by a perfect pink peach.

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The mice made Cinderella a beautiful dancing dress and then she went to the ball and danced the jarabe with the prince. 

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Beauty was sold to a terrible Minotaur and kept in a maze with only a magic mirror to keep her company, but everyone loves a good Greek tragedy. 

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“Look, without our stories, without the true nature and reality of who we are as People of Color, nothing about fanboy or fangirl culture would make sense. What I mean by that is: if it wasn’t for race, X-Men doesn’t sense. If it wasn’t for the history of breeding human beings in the New World through chattel slavery, Dune doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the history of colonialism and imperialism, Star Wars doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the extermination of so many Indigenous First Nations, most of what we call science fiction’s contact stories doesn’t make sense. Without us as the secret sauce, none of this works, and it is about time that we understood that we are the Force that holds the Star Wars universe together. We’re the Prime Directive that makes Star Trek possible, yeah. In the Green Lantern Corps, we are the oath. We are all of these things—erased, and yet without us—we are essential.”
- Junot Díaz, “The Junot Díaz Episode" (18 November 2013) on Fan Bros, a podcast “for geek culture via people of colors” (via kynodontas)